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Major Wildlife Photography Award for Author Paul Colley

Infra-red photograph of bats at dawn

Unique bat photograph from Coate Water in Swindon sweeps to overall victory in the 2018 British Wildlife Photography Awards

Dived Up author Paul Colley CB OBE has won the prestigious British Wildlife Photography Awards. His stunning image of Daubenton bats hunting at Coate Water in Swindon was judged the best British wildlife image of 2018 in a competition that attracts the UK’s top wildlife photographers.

The image is the result of more than a year’s work designing and developing a new infrared camera system to capture images of bats hunting at night. Photographer Paul Colley from Shrivenham near Swindon said that it was quite an emotional moment when he learned that he had won, because the bats had proved the most difficult subject he has ever photographed.

The bats have a body not much bigger than a human thumb and fly unpredictable flight paths at up to 40km/hr in the dark. They are also protected by law and so constrain photography options. But Paul’s novel infrared system proved equal to the task and his amazing new portfolio of work may be the first of its kind in the world.

 Winning Images with Any Underwater Camera
Winning Images with Any Underwater Camera

Paul is well known for his underwater photography and he has photographed almost everything from blue sharks in Cornwall and freshwater fish in southern UK chalk streams to marine iguanas in the Galapagos islands and oceanic white tip sharks in the Red Sea. He is also renowned for his work with major marine and freshwater conservation agencies, which use his images to help create marine reserves, most recently in the Koh Rong archipelago in Cambodia and around Ascension Island in the South Atlantic.

An accomplished writer and author of the award-winning book Winning Images with Any Underwater Camera, Paul hopes that his latest winning image will help promote public awareness of the need to protect all species of UK bats, which are suffering from loss of habitat.

Bat image available following expressions of interest. Point of contact: Paul Colley at pcuw photography ltd: mpcolley.com

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Step One to Improve Your Underwater Photography Results: RAW

RAW setting on camera LCD

Shoot in RAW

If your camera can save photos in RAW format but you are saving in jpeg then you need to read on. If you shoot in RAW but don’t know what to do next, then read on. If you don’t know whether or not you can save in RAW then check your camera settings – look for the menu item to do with the size images are saved as (or check your manual). Continue reading Step One to Improve Your Underwater Photography Results: RAW

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False Coral: Myriapora truncata

Myriapora truncata: false coral

No coral in the Mediterranean they said, but then you see this everywhere…. but dammit – it is a ‘fake’  🙁  called Myriapora truncata. Not to worry, it still looks interesting, especially if you have the benefit of a macro lens for your underwater camera. Continue reading False Coral: Myriapora truncata

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Cuban Honeymoon – Part 3: Diving Cayo Largo

Moray eel - Cuba - Cayo Largo diving

This is the final post in this three-part series. The first part covered the diving at Punta Perdiz, near Playa Giron in the Bay of Pigs. The second part was about snorkelling in the Bay of Pigs.

Cayo Largo is a small island off the south coast of Cuba with no indigenous population. It is the opposite of the sort of place I would normally look to go to – a resort entirely fabricated for tourists. However, the diving is good here and after nine days on the go touring Cuba in the full sun the easy life appealed. Continue reading Cuban Honeymoon – Part 3: Diving Cayo Largo

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